Blog Climate Change History & Theory: Dissertation Urban Agriculture

Urban Agriculture & The Pandemic

For our first dissertation meeting we were tasked with writing an abstract and creating a mood board of our interests. My main interest is urban agriculture. As you can see from below I have included projects, that if you’re interested in nature in cities, you should take a look at: The Farmhouse and The Vertical Farm. I have included important quotes (written below) from the interviews and documentaries that I have watched that have inspired me to undertake this topic for my dissertation.

I had the assumption when researching for my dissertation project that I would want to write about climate change and sustainability only. I researched into urban agriculture and I realised that it is an essential method for us to begin to do to help climate change and the incoming global food crisis.

David Attenborough: A Life On Our Planet

“Right now, we’re facing a manmade disaster of global scale.”

“So, what do we do? It’s quite straight forward. It’s been staring us in the face all along. To restore stability to our planet, we must restore it’s biodiversity.”

“If we take care of nature, nature will take care of us.”

“When it comes to the land, we must radically reduce the area we use to farm, so that we can make space for returning wilderness.”

– David Attenborough, natural historian.

True Garden

“I can control the environment, I control the water, I control the nutrients. I love this, I can control every aspect of growing my own food.”

– Troy Albright, CEO of True Garden

“The vegetables we saw growing at True Garden were just growing, right there. There was no soil, there was minimal water. It was really just their roots hanging in these hollow tubes, being saturated in nutirents and substances and growing to be the most beautiful vegetables.”

– Lauren Kelly Piergallini, reporter

The Plummery

“One of the most important steps that we’ve done is used the raised vegetables beds. When we are eating that much produce, it’s really important. So we can have clean soil that has been brought in. We also know that lead doesn’t generally transfer into fruits so this beautiful blood plum behind us is totally safe to eat from.”

“Much of the composting happens in situ just by chopping the branches and leaving them on the ground underneath the plant.”

“One of the things that’s so concerning about the state that we’re in at the moment is so many people are losing that connection to the land. So The Plummery has been an experiment in how can we regain that connection to food in the city.”

– Kat Lavers, permaculture designer and educator